Being Fit Influences Work Satisfaction

Bonnie Milne, PhD

Bonnie Milne, PhD

This blog post was written in response to the June 2013 Coffee Shop HR World Café topic: “How can we maintain healthier lifestyles at work?”

Not that long ago, I would have promoted the idea of having fitness facilities in the workplace, but I have changed my mind about this. In September of 2012 we moved to a new campus that has a small gym for employees and I have used it once. In spite of that, I am in better shape than I have been in years.

On one of the days when I’m scheduled to work late, I attend a yoga class in the morning. This stops me from coming in to work early and ensures that when I do arrive, I feel great! In the evening and on the weekends, I have been lifting weights, kayaking, snorkeling and playing tennis. These activities have helped me to increase my fitness level and they have encouraged me to meet people. I have new friends who have similar interests and when we are together, work disappears!

In the past, I have exercised at work, and this has simply extended my work day and made my workplace even more of a focus in my life. There have been times when I thought this was fine, but I don’t think so any more. I think well rounded employees need to engage in their community. When they are at work, they are working, but their whole life doesn’t revolve around work and they are less stressed because they have more outlets.

Paula Reece, who is a co-owner of Crossroads Fitness Centers, says that employees who are fit have higher energy levels, are more goal oriented and have higher levels of self-confidence. These are traits that would increase performance in almost any job.
Workplace incentives like gym memberships, paid lessons, personal coaches, and time off for reduced sick leave are good starting points for employers to consider if they want their employees to be healthy and fit.

On the other hand, fitness is a personal issue. Most of us do better if we have a buddy to work out with. Workplaces can provide information about fitness activities in the community; create online programs for employees to find others who are interested in particular activities so they can exercise together. Employers can also promote free websites like my fitness pal where one can track exercise and calories.

My experience is that when I begin to feel and see the benefits of exercising, I become even more committed. According to Moore (2010), my experience is not unique. Annesi (2005) adds that when a person exercises for several months, they come less anxious. As well, the research shows that exercise increases self-efficacy – essentially one’s belief that she can achieve her goals.

Employees with higher self-efficacy tend to set goals that are more challenging and stick to them. Moreover, people with a high sense of self-efficacy invest more effort and persist longer to accomplish a specific task than those with low self-efficacy.

What I found most interesting while perusing through Moore’s dissertation is that employees who exercise have better psychological states, and physical well-being, and as a result were more satisfied with their jobs (Moore, 2010). It is hard to believe that it could be that simple. No need to change jobs, simply exercise more. What great news and what a great opportunity to take control of our lives and our work lives!

Moore, David. (2010) The Relationship Between Exercise and Job Related Outcomes PhD Dissertation UMI Number: 3405149

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